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Management Of Project

The B17 Steam Locomotive Trust (B17SLT) was established as an organisation with charitable status in 2011 and is managed by a board of trustees/directors

Trustee / Directors Roles

Brian Hall

Brian retired in 2011, after a 47 year career in production engineering, production management and works management roles starting in instrument  making but predominantly in the defence industry based in Hertfordshire. Previous experience in steam preservation during the late 1970’s was associated with 92 SQUADRON (BoBLPS.)  Brian is an original subscriber and founder member of the B17 Steam Locomotive Trust from its formation in April 2011 and appointed Chairman in 2012.                                      

Henry Mullens FCA

Henry is a practising chartered accountant and partner in a business specialising in farming and agricultural accountancy and tax management covering the eastern part of the country. Joined the B17 Steam Locomotive Trust as a member and appointed Treasurer in January 2012.                             

Richard Taylor

Richard is experienced in the diverse roles of the company secretariat associated with major business and commerce organisations. He retired in 2014 as a Charted Secretary, which will provide plenty of scope to become involved with the management of the B17 project. Richard joined the Trust in 2014 and last year took on the lead role on behalf of the Essex Group.

Laurence Sampson

Larry spent much of his professional career teaching in secondary education at major schools in The Midlands and Greater London rising to Head of Department. This experience with students, parents and teaching staff helped him develop an interpersonal skill set to identify, motivate and develop everyone’s full potential leading to the creation of successful teams.

He was jointly responsible (with four others) for implementing GCSE as the national examination across the UK. Subsequently he jointly participated in writing the national curriculum. His interfaces with the public, teaching staff, education specialists and politicians required sound project management techniques including good people skills and marketing skills to handle and implement this large national project with its stringent timescales.

Prior to his retirement he established and ran a specialist science college for 12 years. This was dependent upon obtaining a set level of sponsorship funding annually over the first 5 years from commercial sources in return for substantial government funding which was successfully achieved. Further marketing expertise was gained to successfully raise sponsorship and market related academic products and the learning experience.

Peter Wright 

Peter retired in 2011 after 37 years as sole proprietor of the news agency at March Railway Station. A life long interest in railways, acting as  organiser of a local group raising funds in aid of railway preservation and researching railway history. Joined the B17 Steam Locomotive Trust in 2012 as a member and appointed project archivist in 2015.  

John Peat

John retired, after a 46 year career in engineering and project management roles associated with the defence industry in Hertfordshire.Became a member and subscriber of the B17 Steam Locomotive Trust from January 2012, following the provision of support services to the Sandringham project.  John has been instrumental in setting up the management tools for the Trust, establishing links with the Rail and local media and maintaing the topicality of the web site. With a move to Norfolk in 2016 John took a break in his trustee/director role,one year later with domestic arrangements successfully re-established he has rejoined the board and is continuing in these previous roles.

Areas of Specialism / Focus

Technical Aspects

  • Technical baseline established for the locomotive will generally be in accordance with the build standard of 1935, equivalent to the batch of ‘Footballers’ constructed by the LNER at Darlington. Note that some changes will be necessary to meet current legislation requirements as well as technical development to improve performance, reliability and maintenance of the locomotive.
  • The majority of drawings have been identified and are being sourced on a phased basis from the National Railway Museum, York in accordance with the programme and available funding.
  • Preserve and restore the GE tender and the LNER Group Standard tender owned by the Trust for use with the locomotive to maximise operating opportunities and conditions.
  • Employ modern materials, manufacturing techniques and processes during the life of the project.
  • Design, Construction, Inspection, Test and the Project Record System must comply with the Vehicle Acceptance Body (VAB) requirements, in accordance with Railway Group Standards.

Financing the Project

  • The prime source of funding is based upon an ever increasing number of contributors making affordable gifts/donations on a regular basis, including automatic membership at no extra cost. Charitable status enables the Trust to reclaim income tax from HMRC for every donation received from a UK taxpaying resident which provides for a considerable enhancement (currently 25%) in value toward creating the locomotive.

Sponsorship

  • The Trust is actively seeking sponsorship and support from the best of British businesses and professional individuals representing both the commercial and industrial sectors associated with either matched funding arrangements, interest free loans and donations of benefits in kind and work at concessionary rates. 

Work Opportunities

  • During the life of this project the Trust will actively seek to create training and job opportunities for young people and adults to specifically participate and preserve scarce skills. Benefits may also be obtained from the adoption of modern materials, effective use of old and modern techniques and processes associated with steam locomotive design, component manufacture, fabrication and construction disciplines, in order to further preserve this sphere of railway heritage. The use of appropriate facilities and equipment is planned and will be encouraged in partnership with specialised institutions, training establishments, schools, workshops and businesses existing as part of local communities. From the combination of old and modern technology an improved locomotive will emerge compared to the original B17 technical baseline, to deliver enhanced safety, reliability, strength, performance and ease of maintenance to meet the stringent requirements for railway operations in the 21st century. 

Operation and Maintenance

  • Following running, the eventual operating base is planned to be located at a heritage railway site with a connection to the mainline.
  • The locomotive will be maintained in accordance with mainline operating standards and is intended for regular service hauling special chartered trains on the national network, The Class B17 has excellent route availability, capacity for high speed running and range which will make this locomotive a popular choice to operate on the modern railway.
  • In between mainline duties, there will be opportunities for the locomotive to operate at railway heritage sites around the country where the public may enjoy a nostalgic day out or observe the engine close up.
  • Revenue earned will support the upkeep of the locomotive in service and also provide for planned maintenance periods and future overhauls.

 

 

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